When someone in your family is struggling with addiction, it can be complicated, exhausting, and confusing. You must find a delicate balance between being supportive and protecting your own boundaries. Navigating through this environment is often times draining and most families have questions. If you are experiencing problematic substance use in your family, there is support for you. It is important to realize that drug and alcohol use can affect the entire family and it’s wise for family members to get help as well. Below are a few common questions shared by family members of those with problematic substance use issues. 

Read More

Most everyone can relate to the physical withdrawal symptoms of caffeine. Whether you drink coffee or soda, missing your typical dose results in withdrawal. Your body responds to the lack of caffeine with headaches and sluggishness. Of course, this drug is relatively harmless. However, it makes the point that your body reacts to the absence of a substance. When you try to stop drinking alcohol or using heroin or other drugs, you may experience something similar. The reason behind drug withdrawal is similar.

Read More

For those who know a loved one who struggles with addiction, it can be a painful experience. You may wonder why your loved one doesn’t just quit, why they allow alcohol or drugs to hurt them and others. Sadly, addiction is a brain disease that can affect how a person acts. In the throes of addiction, your loved one may have hurt you or those you care for. You may find it hard, even impossible to forgive them for the harm they’ve caused, even after they’ve achieved recovery.

Read More

Fresh out of rehab, I was determined stay sober and make up for all of the time I’d lost drinking. My schedule was packed; I went to meetings every day and attended school full-time. My body was still recovering from the toll alcohol had taken on it, and the medication I was on for anxiety relief left me even more tired. I was unemployed and living off my savings, so I worried constantly about money. My attempts to maintain this hectic schedule left me stressed and on the verge of a breakdown.

Read More

Gina had been sober for 30 days when she got an invitation to a birthday party. She worried alcohol might play a big part at this celebration, but she really wanted to go. After arriving, Gina quickly realized her concerns were warranted. Seeing everyone else drinking, she thought: “I’ll just have one.” With this in mind, she grabbed a bottle of her favorite brew.

Read More

Every recovery story is unique. You might find my story particularly unique, yet even in my situation, I can see the common threads existing for all addicts. For example, the hopelessness and helplessness that occurs with each individual hitting rock bottom. Or the cliché sayings turned tools, which actually and truly apply to every single one of us like “just for today,” “take what you need and leave the rest,” “the next right choice,” “it works if you work it,” or my ultimate favorite “it’s all about perspective.”

Read More

Emotions are tricky. Everyone has them. Everyone struggles with them. Many struggle with how they feel more than anything else in their lives. Then there is the sea of other people’s emotions in which all of us swim. I suspect most of us consider emotions to be more of a liability than an asset.

Read More

Much like addiction treatment, there is no one-size-fits-all way to recovery. While some individuals achieve recovery through residential inpatient, others participate in outpatient counseling, or leverage medication-assisted treatment (MAT).
Whatever gets you to recovery is your unique path.

Read More

Using a sober coach can help you stay sober, while minimizing your risk of exposure to the virus.
If you’re like a lot of people, you’re struggling right now. You might be white-knuckling it through early sobriety during a global pandemic, or finding yourself using drugs and alcohol more and more, tipping the scales from acceptable use to problematic abuse. If you’re in either of those situations, finding a sober partner to help you though recovery can be an important tool.

Read More

The best part of sober fun? There’s zero chance of a hangover. Looking around pop culture, it can seem like fun is inextricably tied to drinking, partying, and even drug use. Once you’ve gone through treatment and are living in recovery, you realize that these activities might seem fun at the time, but they’re actually part of a pattern of self-destructive behavior.

Read More